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Insect spray for fruit trees

Insect spray for fruit trees


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Insect spray for fruit trees

Insect spray for fruit trees is a preparation intended to control pests in the fruiting trees. In the United States, the pesticide is most commonly a topical product, applied to the bark or leaves of the tree.

Many insecticides are based on the pyrethrins, which have been used for over 50 years as a natural insecticide, but this material is poorly absorbed by plant tissue and has been subject to increasing regulatory restrictions. It is also poorly tolerated by animals. Other insecticides are based on organophosphates, which are non-specific (all insects are killed by a single class of chemical, so the pests must develop resistance before it is effective) and cause long-term effects (for example, organophosphates can cause neurotoxicity in mammals and are dangerous to the nervous system of humans).

The USDA defines an insecticide as "any chemical that kills, repels, or controls insects, mites, or other pests on plants."

Insecticide use

The insecticide is usually applied at a low rate, in a liquid form or in a dust, and can be sprayed or spread over the leaves. Sprays may be either directed to the leaves, or the spray can be delivered through a hose to a nozzle or a hand-held sprayer. Many products may be used, and may be intended for use on one or more of a wide variety of pests, for example:

Fruit-tree pest control

Fruit-tree pest control includes the control of pests that cause damage to fruit. The pests may be either pests of the fruit itself, or of the plant itself.

Fruit-tree pest control is typically carried out by the application of an insecticide to the leaves of the tree. If the insecticide is applied to the fruit, it is usually applied to the fruit as a coating on the surface of the fruit. If the insecticide is applied to the fruit as a coating on the surface of the fruit, it may be applied either as a surface spray, or as a fruit dip.

Control of the peach fruit fly

Peach fruit fly is a fly that is a pest of peaches, nectarines and plums.

Peach fruit fly is controlled by the use of insecticides, and in particular, by the application of the insecticide to the leaves of the fruit tree. The insecticide may be applied by foliar spray.

Control of the plum fruit fly

Plum fruit fly is a fly that is a pest of plums.

Plum fruit fly is controlled by the use of insecticides, and in particular, by the application of the insecticide to the leaves of the fruit tree. The insecticide may be applied by foliar spray.

Control of the apple maggot

The apple maggot is a fly that is a pest of apples.

Apple maggot is controlled by the use of insecticides, and in particular, by the application of the insecticide to the leaves of the fruit tree. The insecticide may be applied by foliar spray.

Control of the apple leafroller

Apple leafroller is a fly that is a pest of apples.

Apple leafroller is controlled by the use of insecticides, and in particular, by the application of the insecticide to the leaves of the fruit tree. The insecticide may be applied by foliar spray.

Control of the apple oriental fruit moth

Apple oriental fruit moth is a moth that is a pest of apples.

Apple oriental fruit moth is controlled by the use of insecticides, and in particular, by the application of the insecticide to the leaves of the fruit tree. The insecticide may be applied by foliar spray.

Control of the apple mealybug

Apple mealybug is a fly that is a pest of apples.

Apple mealybug is controlled by the use of insecticides, and in particular, by the application of the insecticide to the leaves of the fruit tree. The insecticide may be applied by foliar spray.

Control of the plum curculio

Plum curculio is a fly that is a pest of plums.

Plum curculio is controlled by the use of insecticides, and